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at film from august of 1963 as demonstration and marchers gathered on the mall here in washington d.c. this was the headline from the washington post, a mammoth rally of 200,000 jamming the mall in a solemn orderly plea for equality. that's our line for those of you over the age of 50. for those of you under the age of 50. 585-3880. 202 is the area code here in washington d.c. we'll get your call on march. >> your calls and comments in a moment. lots get to the other stories this morning that is latest development from syria and headlines from overseas. the guardian newspaper the attack on syria just days away as the house of commons recalled for a vote and the picture of the british prime minster as he departs yesterday as the parliament resuming session tomorrow breaking from their august recess. from the marine herald, -- miami herald, a stage is set. u.s. and allies act as syria's intelligence mount. as u.s. officials said privately that a flood of previously undisclosed intelligence including satellite images and intercepted communication erased last minute administration doubt
by side with james compilingelping him. and arranging his papers. >> she moved back to washington d.c. in her elder years and became very much behind the scenes in a political field again. >> as henry clay famously said, everybody loves mrs. madison. her equally famous response "that's because mrs. madison loves everybody." >> dolley madison came to her service as first lady with experience during thomas jefferson's two terms. the president often called on her to assist him. this sense of the usefulness of diplomacy allowed dolley to hit the ground wanting when she assumed the role in 1809 as her husband james madison became andpresident.good evening welcome. tonight we will learn about the intriguing dolley madison. we have two guests at our table. let me introduce you to them. catherine allgor, an author and biographer of dolley madison. and a historian. one of her books is called "a perfect union." thank you for being here. edith mayo was the creator of the first lady's exhibit at the smithsonian. so many smithsonian visitors have seen this throughout the years. thank you for bei
. definitionging the of cancelable reduce unnecessary treatments. washington journal is live tomorrow. will be back here with the c- span townhall tomorrow looking at immigration and the economy live at 7:00 eastern. thank you for joining us this evening. session two of first ladies and ladies, influence image begins. all this month we are showing encore presentations of season one. programs on every first lady from martha washington to ida mckinley. tonight, it is doubly medicine. -- dolly madison. >> dolley was socially adept and politically savvy. >> she was his best friend. she compensated. >> james madison wishes to meet her. >> she carved out a space for women where they can wield a great deal of political power. >> dolley madison would sit at the head of the table and erect the conversation. >> she got these people to the white house and entertained them. got them together and got them talking. >> this was important to her to make everyone feel welcome. >> it was considered her classic look. people noticed it. >> it was a perfect setting for james and dolley madison >> she sat side by side w
on washington. we are sharing them. it is 7:11.  junk keys junkies junki rise and shine for school, kids. this is a picture of amber makel who is a junior in high school. this is her. it is not a selfie, she looks great. thank you for tweeting this, amber. what about this? this sharp young man, this is dominic jones, ready for kindergarten at imagine foundation. that is so cute. have a great day and great year, dominic. thanks for sending a picture. i love the students in their uniform. they are the cutest thing in their ties. they look so professional. first day of school in calvert, maryland. more pictures should be coming in. you high schoolers tweet us@myfoxdc. we have seen some cute ones. the little uniform. looking like a businessman ready to go to school. love it. >> i know. i asked the kids, what is your job? >> we are students. >> it is. you have to take it seriously. >> did you take it seriously? >> we are a close group of co-workers. what is going on out there? >> the fog is thick in spots. not so much in the city although we have it along the potomac. i have
it in 50 years. the 1963 march on washington. >> now back to roger mudd. >> here at the lincoln memorial, the sight that is almost something no washingtonian has beheld. >> news reports from the march along with coverage of the civil rights movement helped change minds about the protesters and the fight to end segregation. we'll talk with the reporters who were there, including dan rather, who reported for cbs news and paul delaney, a founding member of the national association of black journalists. >>> plus "the new york times" says espn dropped its partnership with public tv's "front line" when the nfl objected to a documentary about head injuries. does this show the influence sports leagues have over sports journali journalism's biggest player? >>> and are you one of the movie goers that made this the top-grossing film last weekend? >> there he is. what's your name sdm. >> cecil gaines. >> i'm carter wilson, head butler. >> did you know the story of "the butler" began with one reporter's quest for the ultimate white house insider? we'll talk with the "washington post"'s wil haygood ab
be a lie. >> got my attention. priceless memories, firsthand witnesses to march on washington gathered in d.c. for a special celebration. we are going to take you there. >> first honoring the best of the best, '72 dolphins get their white house moment. only taken 37 years. 7:09, we'll be right back. ask me what it's like to get your best night's sleep every night. [announcer] why not talk to someone who's sleeping on the most highly recommended d in america? ask me about my tempur-pedic. ask me how fast i fall asleep. ask me about staying asleep. [announcer] tempur-pedic owners are more satisfied than owners of any traditional mattress brand. tempur-pedic. the most highly recommended bed in america. buy a tempur-pedic mattress set and get a free twin tempur-simplicity mattress. find a store near you at tempurpedic.com. ♪ turn around ♪ every now and then i get a little bit hungry ♪ ♪ and there's nothing good for me around ♪ ♪ turn around ♪ every now and then i get a little bit tired ♪ ♪ of craving something that i can't have ♪ ♪ turn around barbara ♪ i finally found t
of blacks in the white house. >> yes. >> this is a q&a for a couple of years ago about the martha washington's slave -- pick it up at the end. >> she found out early 1796 that martha washington was planning to give her away as a wedding gift. during slavery, slaves were given away. this was upsetting for her. because when they died, they would free individuals who were slave to them. and she had hoped down the road she would be out of the institution. but if she's going to be given away, that meant her whole life was going to be in slavery. she's going make plans to escape. she writes, she talks about later, one evening, late spring, 1796 while the washingtons were silting at the dinner table waiting for her to serve them, she went out the back door. rather than say, you know, she escaped, we don't like it, but we'll leave it alone. george decides to kidnap her. they send a nephew back to kidnap her which was actually fairly common. >> how many stories in history like this, slaves in the white house? >> many stories. there were african-americans in the white house, except the james buchanan
"politicsnation" starts right now with reverend al sharpton live from washington, d.c. rev, that had to be one heck of a day in american history to be a part of that. >> no, i was very honored to be part of it. it was an exciting day, a great day. we're going to talk about it on "politicsnation," ed. and you did a great job saturday at the march. we really enjoyed you. you have a little preacher in you. >> i do. i haven't unleashed it all yet, rev. >> all right. all right. >> "politicsnation" starts right now here on msnbc. rev, take it away. >> all right. thank you, ed. thanks to you for tuning in. tonight's lead, the dream lives on 50 years after dr. martin luther king jr. inspired the nation. america's first african-american president reminded us -- reminded all of us that today's economic inequities mean there's still much more work to do. i was there for the day's commemoration as some 100,000 people gathered to hear more than 200 speakers. everyone from former presidents, carter and clinton, to activists and civil rights leaders. at points there was a spontaneous song
night at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span programs on every first lady from martha washington to ida mckinley. tonight, sarah polk, mark rhett taylor and abigail fillmore. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] sarah polk was on diplomacy and her strong suit is intelligence and political discussion. >> she made no bones about the fact she took an interest in politics. and that she was her husband's partner. >> she grew naup political household in tennessee. her father was a local politician so she grew up loving politics. she married james after he won a seat in the legislature. because she would not have married him if he had -- >> unfortunately for james k. polk he died three months after leaving the white house. and sarah began a 42-year widowhood. polk place became a shrine to her husband and she would invite anybody who wanted to to come to visit and see the objects she had collected through her long and illustrious political career. >> to live there for many years on her own. during the civil war, generals on both
-span. programs on every first lady, from martha washington. tonight, elizabeth munro and catherine adams. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] ♪ >> elizabeth monroe was a true partner in her husband's career. they were a love story and absolutely devoted to each other. elizabeth monroe had a well- developed sense of style and image. this is a woman who knew how to carry herself with great elegance. >> it is called the era of good feeling. >> this is a woman who spoke french. >> very great beauty. she received is seldom anything in the white house. she hated it. >> dignity, civility. those are the words that come to mind. >> elizabeth monroe served as first lady from 1817 to 1825 as a time known as the era of good feeling. coming up, we will explore her life and what were not always happy times inside the white house for this woman born into a well-to-do new york family. she married james monroe at the age of 17 and traveled new york extensively with him. she brought with her to the white house a certain french
morning, august 15. ahead on the "washington journal ," your reaction to the latest development in egypt and what the u.s. response should be. you should join the conversation at (202) 585-3880, our line for republicans. (202) 585-3881 for democrats. we also have our line for independents at (202) 585-3882. join us on facebook, send us a tweet, or e-mail address, journal@c-span.org. at somegin with a look of the headlines from outside the u.s., the "guardian" newspaper -- egypt's bloody crackdown. when the story first went to prince, the death toll was 200 78. overnight, the death toll has been updated to 421. there is this from the "miami killed asundreds egypt's forces storm the protest camps. a similar headline from "usa today," egypt the reps in chaos. -- a reps and chaos. from the "wall street journal" website -- egypt's military regime a reps setting off a day of violence that left at least 421 people dead. the government fractured and ties with its international partners in tatters. cairo streets were calm this morning following the curfew overnight with funerals for the dead. fur
, that change does not come from washington. but to washington. that change has always been built on our willingness, we, the people, to take on the mantle of citizenship. you are marching. and that is the lesson of our past. that is the promise of tomorrow. governor martin o'malley, democrat from maryland. and congresswoman marsha fudge, democrat from ohio and the chair of the congressional black caucus. thank you both for coming on tonight. >> thank you. >> thank you for having me. >> governor o'malley, a powerful day, first of all. >> it was tremendous. >> and there is work to do. >> absolutely. and a lot of this work is happening in states and sadly some of the examples are states that are going backwards. but there's other states like my own state of maryland where even in this recession, we've done the things that advance the cause of justice that are also good for creating jobs. we were named by the u.s. chamber number one for innovation and entrepreneurship and we also have the highest minority business goals. highest womens -- number of women-owned firms starting new business. t
into what started ask apartment fire in southeast washington that sent six people to the hospital. no word on the extent of the injuries. that fires started in the 800 block of denver street. we will have a live report from the scene coming up at the top of our 5:00 hour. >> following another developing story, out of d.c. this morning that's where police are looking into an officer involved shooting. now the detailed are very squares, but we do know that a suspect shot a juvenile in the 3,000 block of deboyce street. at some point, a police officer also damaged his or her weapon, there's still no word on where that suspect is this morning. well, switching gears now to the story that has the whole country buzzing. >> yeah, a winning power ball numbers were drawn, and there are three winning tickets splitting that $448 million jackpot. what are holds these numbers is about to collect a serious chunk of change. there are three jackpot winning tickets and those lucky people will share roughly $448 million. >> two of the winning tickets were sold in new jersey, one at the super stop and shop in
in the 1963 march on washington remember the events of that day in a discussion hosted by the martin luther king, jr. memorial library in washington, d.c. this is an hour 30 minutes. >> when our archivist suggested that i conduct oral histories with people that attended the march, i jumped at the opportunity to hear firsthand accounts of the days that i, like many of you, had only known about in books, photos and media reflections. i was curious about literal and other journeys that people took to get to the lincoln memorial on that hot august day in 1963. we put out a call for people it into the march to be interviewed and the panelists here today were the first to answer that call. it is important to note that this is the beginning of an ongoing project and derek and our collection not only oral histories but also memorabilia and other artifacts from the march to the washingtonian the community archive. two of the panelists, peter bailey and doctor ella kelly were right under my nose as their regular attendees to the black studies lecture series that takes place in the black study center
anniversary of the march on washington. wasn't it exciting to see the enthusiasm and the film of the people of the day? who could have expected so many of us would be here who had ties to all that was owing on? who could suspect that we would all be with john lewis? [applause] attorney general, mr. mayor, you honor us with your presence. .he fierce urgency of now words rang out across the national mall, the call echoed in households across america. the summons ignited a movement to make real the promise of democracy. of course everyone knows the "i had a dream" speech, but the fierce urgency of now part of it was not only an inspiration, it was a motivation to act. was not the first time dr. martin luther king jr. urged fellow travelers to reject the status quo, to in his words at the march, refuse to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. seven years early now to trim of in francisco, my hometown, 1956, dr. king delivered the same message to the delegates of the naacp convention. --said "now i realize those all over are telling us we must slow up, he said, but we cannot afford this slo
, extra, read all about it! "washington post" has been sold! whoa! hey, good morning, everybody. nation's capital waking up to that shocking bit of news this morning and people all around the country talking about it, as well. good morning, good morning, great to see you. it's a tuesday. tuesday, august 6th, in fact. and we are here in our nation's capital, booming out to you all across this great land of ours on your local progressive talk radio station, lucky if you've got one and give them your full support and on current tv for another week and a day here. and we're glad to be with you whether you're watching or listening, keep up with us here on the "full court press" and join the conversation. because our job is to let you know what's going on this morning here in our nation's capital, around the country and around the globe. your job is to tell us what you think about it all. and what you think we ought to be doing about it. 1-866-55-press is your ticket. that's our toll free number. 1-866-55-press. and then you go on twitter, if you prefer. give us your comments at bpshow or on
in washington, d.c., where events are already underway for the 50th anniversary march on washington. thousands of people are gathered here already, with more continuing to stream in. among those scheduled to speak today are martin luther king iii, merly evers williams, the reverend al sharpton, attorney general eric holder, and john lewis. the only person to speak at the original march who is still alive today. here he is in 1963. >> by the forces of our demand, our determination, and our numbers, we shall splinter the segregated south into a thousand pieces and put them together in the image of god and democracy. we must say, wake up, america! wake up! for we cannot stop and we will not and cannot be patient. >> on that day, 50 years ago, 250,000 people gathered here to demand the rights of full citizens. they demanded comprehensive civil rights legislation, school desegregation, full employment, living wages, and the aggressive use of federal authority to ensure economic political and social justice. 50 years later, we have made progress, was the struggle continues for those same demands. we
. "washington journal" is next. ♪ good morning. august 12, 20 13. attorney general eric holder is set to announce that low-level, nonviolent drug offenders will no longer be charged minimum mandatory sentence -- sentences. it is part of an overall package to reform american prisons. he will make the remarks at the american bar association today in san francisco. we want to begin there. what is your take on the attorney general's proposal to reform the prison system in this country? republicans -- democrats -- independents -- you can send us a tweet if you go to twitter.com @cspanwj. on our facebook page, facebook.com/c-span. or e-mail us. we will begin with the front page of the "washington post" -- this is what the attorney general is going to propose, that low-level, nonviolent drug offenders with no ties to gangs or large-scale drug organizations will no longer be charged with offenses that impose severe mandatory sentences. it goes on to say it goes on to say we want to get your thoughts on this. what do you think about the attorney general setting this forward? this is his goal.
northern maryland, washington county near home invasiontown to west virginia, martinsburg is getting wet, i think that's going to stay north of the metro area so anything will be light, short lived and not very widespread, however, things are going to be changing as we head into the afternoon hours for today and there you can see our weather headlines featuring warm and muggy conditions. we'll see some showers and thundershowers this afternoon that could produce some heavy downpours and there could be some standing water on some of the roadways as that heavy rain comes down. but the weekend, which, of course, is upon us -- happy friday, by the way -- are looking better. we can't rule out showers altogether this weekend but the majority of it is looking better. we'll have that in your end in in a few minutes. right now from the belfort furniture weather center, we need to go to wtop, amanda is out today and bob bob is in the wtop traffic center. >> 295 moving well into town, no issues coming in on pennsylvania avenue or on route 50. we're steady headed through annapolis and bowie, coming in
for the weekend. cooler pattern for the weekend. >> 74 right now in washington. 73 this new york city. a little cooler north and west. columbus is 62 and binghamton 60 degrees. we're on the warm side of things. we'll watch the temperaturese warm up to the 80s andnd eventually upper 80s near 90. 9. much like yesterday. yesterday turned to a nice day.d a little t bit of cloudiness tos start your day. it's holding back the follow fol vegment which is good newsews because yesterday we had localll very dense fog.. still a possibility before sunrise. we coll see fog develop. particularly if you are a viewer to the west bewareuld encounter thick, dense fog without much notice.ce. otherwise partly sunny today ant could be a scattered shower or thunderstorm this afternoon as we heat up the atmosphere.tmos warm and humid. 88 is the high. >> thank you tucker. time now 20 check in with julie wright and get an update on the morning commute.morn >> we're starting off quiet this morning.ing. so far without issue for folks headed around the capitol beltway. you will find your lanes are open if y
baby. good morning, washington at 5:00 a.m. beginning right now. >> live, and in h.d., this is good morning, washington. on your side. >> good morning, washington. i'm scott. >> thank you for waking up with us on this tuesday morning. we will start with your weather, head over to jackie do talk about the forecast, you rah going to need that umbrella today, jackie. >> . >> all right, we will -- we are going to get back to jackie in just a second, they are having a little bit of a technical issue, let's get on over to amanda. >> 66 eastbound, with ehave a work zone that is still lingering this morning. now, we just got word that the two left lanes are closed. we can see on this live shot that they are staying in that far right lane, and it looks hay may have just picked up those cones there. that camera beaks up every once in a while. hopefully that will get cleared soon. our mapping system shows thaws will be eastbound. the right lane was closed but the traffic center, tells us that they do have that moved over to the shoulder now. so all lanes are open, just expect some slight slow
after the march on washington, let us remember that dr. king's last march was never finished. the poor people's campaign was never finished. some 50 years after the march on washington, while if you were -- you are people as a percentage in our country are poor, more as a number in our country are poor. while the ladder of opportunity extends to the heavens for our people today, more are tethered at the bottom and falling off everyday. say that thean distance between a child's aspirations represented by the top of that letter and a family situation at the bottom of that is the exactder measurement of that aaron's level of frustration. as we go home today, let us remember that the dreamer was also a doer. as we turn on our tvs tomorrow and see people walking out of places where they are being forced to survive on $7.25 by the thousands, let us commit to join them in fighting to lift up the bottom. at the top of that letter has extended, the tethers at the bottom must be unleashed. let us not just be dreamers. let us recommit to be doers. thank you, and god bless. [applause] >> from dest
, august 22nd. a live look at the sun looks up over the washington, d.c. region. another humid day. good morning everyone i am sarah simmo simmons. >> and i am wisdom martin. time to bring the tucker barnes for the weather. >> warm and humidity with temperatures expected to top out upper 80s maybe 90. we have been getting close to 90. a few scattered storms will which change up the weather pattern for the weekend. >> okay. >> radar showers overnight eastern maryland. i haven't been down to the beach this summer. >> you have been all over the country. >> i have been one or two places. >> you need a quick road trip before school. [laughter]. bethany dealing with light showers. 74 reagan national. temperatures expected again upper 80s near 90. scattered storms by 4:00 p.m. >> thank you, tuck er. >> let's check on jeff newman. >> sky fox accident on the left side at 109 in hyattstown. that is the southbound side to the right. northbound defected as well. once passed that juncture to fredricksburg. you are at a better pace, through prince georges county, no accidents reported typical volume
. let's play "hardball." good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. ask yourself, would abraham lincoln be a republican in 2013? would the man sitting up in that chair yesterday be invited to join the party of the birth errs, nullifiers and talkers of succession? just ask yourself in a lineup of ted cruz, rick perry and michele bachmann, and the great emancipator, who would be the odd man out? the reason the republican party wasn't represented yesterday at the king reunion at the lincoln memorial is that the republican party no more longer represents abraham lincoln. its real leader today would be jefferson davis or george wallace or strom thurmond, or some other character in the long list of null fires and obstructionists and states righters. can you imagine the reaction of tom paul had he been alive at the time of the emancipation proclamation? please don't ask. can you imagine to rick perry's claim that texas has the right to succeed from the unionany time it phil feels like it. the values of abraham lincoln, the belief in a strong federal government, the paramount right of h
. are all the storms over. wjz is live with first warning weather coverage. marty is in mount washington with the mobile weather lab. meteorologist chelsea ingram is in the first warning weather center. we'll start with chelsea. >>> hello everyone. we're quiet for now. things have calmed down a bit. take a look at live first warning doppler weather radar. we had a few showers and thunderstorms push over on the eastern shore, some residual from what went on this morning. we have a few spotty showers in the lower eastern shore, honestly not a lot going on. we had so much activity move through earlier today all out ahead of a cold front passing through this afternoon. here it is, we brought you back in time. you can see these strong thunderstorms developing where you see the pink and purple and black, that's where we have indicators of hail and potentially even the location of some potential tornadoes that the national weather service will be serving later today, and we looked at harford county and cecil county. those were the two main spots where we had the strongest weather move through w
washington. six people, including children, were hospitalized. sam ford is live with what happened. me arepeople behind boarding the place up, but early this morning it was a scary situation with the flames shooting into the sky, people screaming for their lives. fortunately, firefighters acted quickly. it was around 1:00 this morning this six unit behind -- the six unit to link behind good hope road became a raging fire. the family was screaming. >> neighbors felt powerless. >> they were halfway hanging out the window trying to avoid the smoke. >> inside was ms. dickens, with her two sons, ages 16 and 12, and two baby grandchildren. >> there was a lot of black smoke everywhere. gown,ll in her hospital she tried to lower her 16-year- old son out the back window so she could drop the grandchildren, ages 1 and 3 to him, but he fell. fortunately, firefighters arrived quickly and rescue the rest of the family bilateral. they were taken to the hospital. they were all later released, including the 16-year-old son, an anacostia high school football player. their sister was not home at the
pagar cuelgue el telÉfono y contacte a su compaÑÍa para verificar si son ellos.. en washington dc lilian mass univision .. en el tercer dia del juicio contra el guatemalteco acusado de asesinar a una joven estudiante, el jurado escucho la confesion de julio blanco garcia... silvana quiroz ha estado siguiendo el caso y se encuentra en vivo desde la corte en fairfax..silvana.. el soldado que filtro datos confidenciales de estados unidos fue sentenciado hoy.. bradley manning recibio la condena de 35-aÑos en prision por divulgar miles de documentos secretos militares y diplomaticos a wikileaks... durante la audiencia, manning de 25-aÑos no mostro reaccion al escuchar el veredicto del juez...manning fue declarado culpable el mes pasado de 20-cargos, incluyendo seis por espionaje... el proximo 28 de agosto, se celebrara el 50- aniversario de la marcha en washington en donde martin luther king jr. proclamo su famoso discurso "tengo un sueÑo".. organizaciones comunitarias dicen que los derechos migratorios son parte del legado que dejo dicha marcha en 1963... fernando pizarro nos tiene
in washington, she took her sweets where she could find them. apparently she had her sons and others buy chocolate shells by the barrelful and she writes about the medicinal qualities of fudge. i mean it was as if she took it where she could find them. that's pretty pathetic. >> i would say that the shells are probably not bon-bons. she is not sitting on her sofa munching. they're the cocoa bean shell. you would steep them in hot water. it would be like coffee and you would add milk. she was interested in the medicinal qualities of it. i wouldn't go too far on john quincy's sourness. there is affection between the two of them and great love. otherwise she could have stayed in quincy. >> after they lost, i think, the daughter, is it true he gave her a book on the diseases of the mind? >> some months later, yes. >> it's the modernize, the insensitivity. he is certainly not a modern husband. louisa had by one count nine miscarriages. >> minimum five and a still birth, officially more. -- potentially more. they are sometimes hard to read into it because of how discreet they are with their la
electric grid. then a look at a recent survey on american's view on aging. "washington journal" is next. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioned by the national captioning institute -www.ncicap.org--] ♪ host: one of the more news headlines this friday morning said the u.s. is treading lightly as the prices deepens in egypt. this has nearly 600 people have been killed amid what are being described as ferocious clashes between protestors and security forces. and another headline says egyptians are bracing for more bloodshed today. to the question that's out there. should the u.s. cut off foreign aid to egypt. a lot of folks are saying that but so far, it hasn't happened. what do you think? call numbers on your screen. or you can put your voice on the program via twitter, facebook and send us an maul -- -- e-mail theere is the front page of "wall street journal" today. the lead headlines says egyptians are bracing for more bloodshed. there is a photo of egyptian soldiers guarding an area around a
on washington, i pay tribute to the visionary organizer of the original march by rustin. as a fellowship of reconciliation staff, rustin co- founded and organized the first freedom ride in 1947. an african-american gay man, rustin was a quaker. his life commitment to nonviolence as a spiritual discipline exemplifies that pacifism is anything but passive. he pursuit -- refused to accept more by denying society's expectations that he be straight. he refused to be at war with another nation by being in prison as a conscientious objector during world war ii, and he refused to be at war with humanity by not accepting diminishment or division based on race. in every situation, rustin rejected violence, conflicts, and strife, and instead showed peace. he and rev. james lawson, another staffer, are credited with convincing rev. dr. king early on that nonviolence had to be the path to freedom. and so, on this day, how can we pay tribute to this legacy of nonviolence and peace, to dr. king's refusal to see another as enemy, as we are poised to attack syria? rustin and king showed us, over and over
, his guilty" issumed premiering on msnbc will stop on the next washington journal, the rise of the conversation on drones and privacy issues. 745, -- and seven: 45, would talk about domestic drones -- at 7:45, we talk about the usage of domestic drones. , a privacy and west. washington journal begins live at 7:00 a.m. eastern time every day on c-span. wednesday, the center for american progress hosts a former -- a forum for preventing and ending human trafficking. obama's half-sister will be a speaker at the event. remember the march ending and dr. king delivering that speech will stop president kennedy invited us back to the white house and he stood in the door of the oval office to meet each one of us. he was like a beaming and proud father. he was glad that everything had gone so well. .e said, you did a good job he said to dr. king, you had a dream. >> tomorrow, we will look back with a panel conversation with john lewis and your chance to call in and comment. starting at 1:00 p.m. eastern time. ladieson two of first begins monday, september 9 with a look at the life of
at the national press club in washington, d.c. he addressed a voter id laws and the feature of the republican party. this is about one hour. >> our speaker today is benjamin jealous,who at 35 became the youngest president and ceo of the national association for the advancement of colored people. a mixed race kid from california, jealous grew up in a family always challenged by the issue of race. according to an interview in "essence" magazine, his grandparents faced obstacles dating back to slavery. his mother helped desegregate her high school in baltimore, and joined sit-ins at lunch counters in virginia. his father told him what it was like to be the lone white guy at a lunch counter sit-in and getting worked over by the police, who saw him as a race traitor. as a kid, mr. jealous recalls being at a discount store with a black friend, and noticing a white lady peeking at them through the pegboard to make sure they were not stealing anything. he has led advocacy, but he could, at one time, qualify for mentorship at the national press club. reliable reports say he once tried his hand at inve
a rolls along washington streets between 11 at night and 7 in the morning and there will be a increased police presence outside the student apartments on north wolf street. >>> 21 million dollars is on its way to curtis bay and senator mikulski is excited about the long lasting impact on baltimore's. [audio not understandable] >> it will enabled us to have jobs the next 4 or 5 years and lay the groundwork. [audio not understandable] >> it will be used to upgrade critical equipment like tugboats to break up ice. some will go toward the repairs of the eagle. 82 military personnel and more than 500 civilian workers work at the curtis bay coast guard station. >>> later today, prz obama is ex-- president obama is speced to sorn-- expected to sign a bill to slash interest rates on student loans. the white house says the plans will save millions of students for an average of 1500 dollars on loans they take out for school this year. >>> time to stalk sports. 6 minutes after 5 -- time to talk sports. 6 minutes after 5. the ravens blasted the bucs 44-16 in the preseason opener. runningback pierce
an accident at the harbor tunnel thruway it is a disabled vehicle. another accident on washington boulevard at old washington road in howard county. 795, 60 miles per hour. once you get to the west side, 11 minutes. 11 minutes on the north side. this is harford road. an easy start from 95 over towards the 83's. that is the latest on traffic pulse 11. little bit ofe a rain to contend with. some heavy downpours could develop this afternoon. some rain showers out in the western suburbs around frederick. those are just sprinkles. you will see some thunderstorms redevelop this afternoon. temperatures in the mid to upper 80's. it will feel warmer than that because of the humidity. >> 76 degrees at the airport. some parents still have a lot of shopping to do to get their children ready for back-to- school. no sales tax on some of your purchases. cyber-mart promoting a money for back-to-school shopping. some gun owners will be taking their guns to star >> welcome back. good morning. 5:15. somebody left the lights on. is that the stadium? justin timberlake? they left the lights on all night long. we
. go to doug luzader live in washington with the latest. >> good morning. whatever coalition the president was hoping to build here now appears to be in at that timers this morning with a key u.s. ally now saying it will not take part in a military strike on syria. the administration suffered a big set back of particlism refusing to back any attack. >> the british parliament does not want to see british military action. i get that and the government will act accordingliful>> president obama meantime is expected to seek congressional approval for action in syria. it raises serious constitutional questions. select members of congress to make a case of war outlining evidence that the syrian regime avoid chemical weapons. the president did not take part in it. >> they are going to issue a statement and they are in the process of de classifying. when we do that we do understand. it's up to the president of the united states to present this case to sell it to the american public. >> that is going to be the next likely step. they are likely to release a de classified version to the
>> and "good morning, washington," it is monday, august 12th, i'm scott thuman. >> and i'm jummy olabanji. we're going to start with weather and head over to meteorologist jacqui jeras this morning with a check of your forecast, jacqui. >> hey, good morning, guys, a decent start overall today, it will feel like summer. warm and sticky. look at our temperatures already in the he 70s in many areas, 75 in d.c., 70 mans, 72 in culpeper where you have a little bit of fog this morning as well, 69 in dulles and 68 degrees in gaithersburg. so our weather headlines for today, it's going to be warm with a few thunderstorms possible late today but the large majority of the day will be dry. tomorrow is when things will kick up with more widespread showers and thunderstorms so a few could be on the severe side especially south and east of the metro and much cooler weather is on the way for the middle and latter part of the week along with a lot of sunshine. more details on that coming up in your 70 just a few minutes away from. the belfort furniture weather center let's go to wtop, rob woodfo
majorities across all groups express little or no trust in washington. >> you need to have trust in government for the government to work effectively. >> good evening. perino. in the latest news about the nsa giving americans yet another reason to distrust our government, "the washington post" revealing that the nsa has broken privacy rules, thousands of times, every year since 2008. and the chief judge of the secret court that's supposed to police the government's spying program says that the court has limited ability to do its job. the nsa issuing this response, quote, when nsa makes a mistake and carrying out its foreign intelligence mission, the agency reports the issue internally and to federal overseers and aggressively gets to the bottom of it. congressman goudi joins us. thank you for being here on a friday evening. let me ask you. when you first heard of this news last night, were you surprised or in line with what you thought was probably happening? >> well, dana, i would like to tell you i'm still surprised when government disappoints and when there's evidence we can't
and criticizing washington for the handling of the nsa leak case. he says the former analyst will remain in russia for the foreseeable future. isright now, edward snowden beyond alarm -- the long armf the law, but his father suggests he could come home to face trial. the nsa leaker is not headed back to the united states because he will not get a fair trial. my son tother i will come home if i believe in the justice system that we should be afforded will be applied correctly. >> and tell that he says he will visit his son in russia. homeolitical furor here at shows no sign of cooling off. before leaving for his vacation on martha's vineyard president obama said he had already been moving the nsa toward more transparency and accountability. >> i don't think mr. snowden was a patriot. >> he betrayed his oath of office for a generation that believe he is a jason bourne and there has got to be some transportation. he has failed to explain these programs which are lawful which has saved lives which of stopped terrorists. >> washington wants edwards noted brought back home to face justice. he would like
washington journal for august the third. potential attacks by al qaeda has part of the state department to issue a worldwide alert for travelers. the attacks may occur before the end of august with north africa and the middle east been the focus of that threat. wall street journal reporting that a bill is being proposed that would double the amount of guest worker visas. turning to the economy, the unemployment figure is at 7.4% with 162,000 jobs created in august. that is the economy nationwide. we want to get your take on the economy. is it getting better or worse yet go and how much washington how -- or worse yet go and how much does washington -- influence does washington have. again, for our first 45 minutes on the to get your take economy. you can call us on those lines. if you want to reach out to us on social media, twitter @ cspanwj. on facebook we have about 13 comments. you can always send us an e-mail at journal@c-span.org. here are the figures from the front page of the wall street journal -- it also talks about the unemployment figure, standing at 7.4%. that is
.. >> the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. and later, senator tom coburn hears from his constituents during a town hall meeting in oklahoma. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: walt mossberg, has technology plateaued? >> guest: oh, no, absolutely not. absolutely not. technology is always changing and always coming up with -- technology companies are always coming up with something new, and there are new technology companies all the time incubating, a lot of them are in what we call stealth mode. we don't even know who they are. certain technologies plateau and things move on, but in general, no. not at all. >> host: i guess i ask that because the last couple years we've had the explosion of smartphones, we've had tablets come online. what's out there? >> guest: well, first of all, there are vast numbers of people especially in the less developed cups, but even in the developed countries who don't own a smartphone and, certainly, there are vast thurms that don't own -- numbers th
. programs on every first lady from martha washington wine mckinley. tonight, harriet lane. quite she is probably the most tragic of all the first ladies. she hated it with a passion. she did not move into the white house with peace. >> they had eight rooms they had to furnish. when she arrived, she basically holed up and spent much of her time writing letters to her dead son. she called them my presaged child. a very poignant letter. , andey were returning there was a terrible accident. . it was devastating for the family. god.she concluded this was forhe house was too much jane to take care of. i don't think she was interested in housekeeping particularly. >> most regarded peer us as a failure in the office. >> it was the happiest of all presidencies. >> good evening. on this program, we learned about the final first ladies of the antebellum era. whose tenurepierce was defined by overwhelming loss. the time she and her husband are brought to the executive mansion, they have lost all fore of their young sons the next 45 minutes, we will .elve into jane pierce good evening. welcome. >
bought and sold in washington. i'm sorry, what are you saying? >> ok. >> the democracy is bought and sold in washington. this is not the idea of democracy that brought me to the united states. i came from another country where there was a dictatorship, i was expecting ideal democracy where one person and one vote was -- host: where are you from originally? >> cameroon. >> my daughter was snatched from the street not because she was doing anything wrong simply because she stopped ask directions from a cop that doesn't understand french and she doesn't understand english, and because of that she has been in a mental substitution for eight years. i've done my best, everything i could to get out and she can't get out. from france where she came from and now she can't go back to france. the immigration will not deport her to anywhere. so i don't know what else anybody can do in this country to have the right justice, t take you can't jus anybody from the streets or your house. host: angie from scombrooksville, florida. -- from jacksonville, florida. good morning, you're from our independent l
to be more relaxing than entertaining in washington. she was less worried serving 100 people here than 20 in washington. many important figures would be seated with them. thomas jefferson was frequently here. james monroe was here. henry clay. margaret smith. once while mrs. madison was serving at the head of the table the vice president offered to do the honors for her and she responded oh no, watch with what ease i do it. and he had to admit she did it with unparalleled ease. it was as if she were born and educated worsen inverse i. versailles. >> and looking at their life when they returned there, how was it compared to when they lived in the white house? >> i think they were besieged by people who wanted to associate themselves with the mad sons. many visitors in addition to -- political visitors in addition to family and friend. sort of like the washingtons and the jeffersons. everybody wanted to meet the great personages. so they had people in the house with them. not only relatives but many political visitors as well. >> she was devoted to him and getting his papers together in tha
. .. with the president to announce plans for the march on washington. in support of the civil rights act. >> june 12th, 1963 as everest was returning home for the naacp meeting member byron shot him in his driveway as he was getting out of his car. evers was killed instantly. ♪ ♪ >> randolph and fellow americans , the national urban league is honored to be a participant in this historic occasion. our presence here reflects not only the civil rights communities increasing the awareness of the urban league, but most important it says and i hope what and clear that while intelligence, maturity and strategy dictates a civil rights agency we use different methods and we are all united as never before on the goal of first class citizenship. >> to present to you the moral leader of the nation. i have the pleasure to present to you dr. martin luther king. [applause] i am happy to join with you today what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation. [applause] five years ago, a great american in the shadow we stand today signed the emancipation proclamatio
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